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Ah lol

Hey :) so in a previous discussion, I was talking about one of my females I got from a breeder may be pregnant. Well the golf ball look has arrived. how long do you think it will be? and what would you recommend to do before and afterwards?

Thanks so much for reading this :)

Comments

  • zany_toonzany_toon Mouse
    Posts: 631
    Oh no :( I was hoping she wouldn't be pregnant :(

    Anyway, mice are normally pregnant for 21 days or close to that, so I would count from when you collected the girls from the breeder (although maybe worth checking to make sure her sister is definitely a sister and not a brother!!) as that will give you the latest date she might give birth. I don't think there is much you need to do before hand other than give her a really good diet with a little bit more protein (this is something I've seen a lot of people argue over but I think the person I know that used to breed said she found an extra mealworm or two was enough during pregnancy.) I'd also aim to clean the girls cage out a few days before you think she is due as cleaning out when the babies are newborn may stress her out. Once the babies are here mum will need more protein to help her with feeding the babies, so a few more mealworms or a boiled or scrambled egg - or even some boiled chicken :) People vary as to when they handle the babies, some want in right away others put off. With my accidental litters I waited until the babies had fur (at around 7 days old) before I handled them. Rubbing your hands in dirty bedding (after you've removed mum for a break, she will definitely appreciate it!) can stop your smell being left on the babies, and handle them for short periods as they will lose heat quickly - try to put the nest back as you found it.

    I'd also check the bar spacing on your cage - babies can get out of really tiny gaps so if you have a cage with wide gaps you may need to cover it in mesh. And remove levels or wheels for a while - mum might want to have her babies on a ledge and if they fall it could be very hurtful. As for the wheel - you don't want any babies to be holding on to mum while she is trying to run in the wheel!!

    I can't think of anything else just now I'm afraid, but it may be worth reading some of the other threads in this section to see what others have suggested as we have been very quite lately :(
  • NoesberryNoesberry Lemming
    Posts: 20
    Thank you so much,  
    Nearly at 2 weeks since I got them. When I rang the breeder apparently there was a male in there that she accidentally miss sexed, so I will be triple checking. 
    I am worried as they are so young.
  • zany_toonzany_toon Mouse
    edited November 2015 Posts: 631
    Noesberry said:

    Thank you so much,  

    Nearly at 2 weeks since I got them. When I rang the breeder apparently there was a male in there that she accidentally miss sexed, so I will be triple checking. 
    I am worried as they are so young.
    Quite a few of us have had things like this happen - hopefully it will all be ok, mice are very good at doing what comes naturally :) To check your mice for sex though, only females have nipples so if they both have that then you are fine :) I forgot they were so young though, so I'd increase mum's protein a little bit just now. I'm sure she will love some chicken :)
  • NoesberryNoesberry Lemming
    Posts: 20
    sweet, I will do that now, are meal worms ok? or are they to much?
  • AnnBAnnB Mouse
    Posts: 962

    Mealworms will be fine and most mice love them. The mice will only need a small amount - perhaps half a mealworm a day each, or every other day.

    Extra nesting material will be welcomed by mum, as she'll soon want a cozy place to give birth. Soft paper bedding is good, no fibrous strands to get tangled round tiny paws. My mice gave birth in those little plastic houses which did enable me to open the lid carefully to check on babies while mum wasn't looking but I also had a problem with condensation inside.

    It's worth making a note of the date of birth so that you can separate any baby boys at 4 - 4.5 weeks to prevent any accidental pregnancies.

  • racingmouseracingmouse Mouse
    Posts: 1,229

    Not what you want or expect really but if it happens it happens. Not the end of the world. :) Mice are good mum`s so take the advice already given and you will be fine. The breeder should really have been more careful with the genders. Hopefully she won`t have a large litter, maybe three or four little ones to deal with. Take some notes down. Day/date they were born and any colourings/marking the babies have once they are growing fur. You could draw little mouse diagrams and put the marking on those to identify who is who as this will help you when sexing any babies when they become four to five weeks old.

    Keep us posted. x

  • NoesberryNoesberry Lemming
    Posts: 20
    these are brill ideas! 
    Thank you so much for all the help. They both literally snatched a mealworm from my hand. And i'll get a little book to start keeping notes down and diagrams of them.

    I'll probs want to keep one....or a few....But what about homing them. People tell me to put then in pet stores but I am not sure as I want them to go to good homes (not saying that the people from there arnt). What is your take on that?


  • racingmouseracingmouse Mouse
    Posts: 1,229

    I would advise keeping them all if there are only three or four. You might end up with more though, some of which might be males and male mice are (a) smelly and more difficult to rehome and (b) are notorious for falling out and need separating later on. So wait and see how many babies arrive and then look at their genders closely once they can be sexed. If most are females, they can stay with the mum from day one. Any male babies can live together as brothers in their own cage/tank, but could possibly end up fighting when they start becoming adults and hormonal.

    As for handing them in to a pet shop....well most of us wouldn`t want to go that route because one, if you care about where they end up, you don`t have the final say, the shop does. If you advertise them on free ad`s or Gumtree and the like, reptile keepers could want them for either food or breeding purposes, so neither suggestion sounds good really.

    The best place to offer any unwanted baby mice up for adoption is to use this forum, or forums that have a good record of having members who trust and know one another. Not always easy as you could still be sent a private message saying can  offer your mice a good home and be lying through their teeth! So unless you keep them, I would think about your options on this and do what you feel is the most ethical for the mice. x

  • AnnBAnnB Mouse
    Posts: 962

    There are one or two decent pets stores but I think I'd prefer to use a mouse rescue if you're not able to rehome any babies yourself. At least they can check out potential owners a bit and provide back-up if an owner is no longer able to care for the mice.

    You could also ask Crittery (Admin) if you can advertise them on the forum.

  • NoesberryNoesberry Lemming
    Posts: 20
    i think, i'll keep them lol I dont want to even think about what could happen to them.
  • racingmouseracingmouse Mouse
    edited November 2015 Posts: 1,229

    Thing is, although there are mouse keepers, breeders, owners and lovers out there, mice are not widely kept as pets generally which is why they are not normally seen in pet shops. Pets At Home don`t sell mice for a reason. They just don`t get the same attention that hamsters, gerbils and other small pets do which is sad. Rats seem more generally available now in pet shops than mice.

    Try not to worry too much really. Wait and see how many babies come along and get some idea of where you want to be given the numbers and genders. Ann is right though, small rodent rescues are the people who are best contacted as they have the right questions to ask and usually find loving homes for mice. Forums play a big role like ours, but sometimes it can be sheer luck finding the right person/persons to take on pet mice and generally like them and know a bit about their care. x


  • NoesberryNoesberry Lemming
    Posts: 20
    hey guys, just thought I would update you all. the babies have been born. i'll leave them for a few days and then see how many there is.

    Thank you all for the help :)
  • zany_toonzany_toon Mouse
    Posts: 631
    Babies :D Can't wait to see photos when you are able to handle them - you have to promise loads of photos :D
  • NoesberryNoesberry Lemming
    Posts: 20
    i promise loads of photos :) The babies are small, but there are ten of them lol.
  • AnnBAnnB Mouse
    Posts: 962
    Oh how exciting! Can't wait to see the photos.
  • racingmouseracingmouse Mouse
    Posts: 1,229
    Wow, ten pinkies! Congrats. Don`t worry, mum will do what she has to do. Dry mealworms (sold in poundland and pet shops) are something like 60% protein, so you could use those to add protein to their diet. Just a few each day. Mealworms are probably the easiest way to add that extra protein although soya and nuts and a few other sources can also be good in small amounts. Hope you have mostly females in the litter but get your little diary ready and once they are four weeks to five weeks, you should be able to tell which are males (draw their marking on a sheet of paper to identify them visually) and you can do the separations when necessary and have a spare cage/tank ready for the baby males. x
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